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Did you know that a child who has survived domestic violence, is likely to earn less

 

Domestic violence is not something that only affects a certain group of people. Let’s have a look at a man and a woman in an abusive relationship, the consequences do only just affect these two people. This is especially true if children are involved, as this problem can then extend into the next generation, and so the cycle carries on. But the problem doesn’t just stay within the family or relationships involved, the issue can also have an effect on the economy.

 

Suné Payne wrote an article on the matter for the Daily Maverick, explaining that billions of South African Rands goes towards costs involving violence or abuse against children. The article also explains how those children who have been abused are more likely to go into the world and earn a lot less than those that have not been abused. You can read more about this article here.

 

Domestic Abuse can be seen as a major public health issue, as it affects millions of people in the country. This is a problem that can affect a person’s entire life. Problems that arise can include things like physical injuries that need medical care, the use of thousands of rands towards health-care costs, the reduction of work productivity and in severe cases the death of the victim.

Some more consequences or risk factors of Domestic Abuse

  • Poor physical and mental health, a child can develop anxiety and depression that can have long-term effects.
  • The child who grows up around abuse may fall out of school and have a lack in education
  • This can then lead to poverty
  • The child could also develop a substance abuse, which in turn can lead to even more problems with money.
  • Some may develop a shopping addiction, which helps them escape from bad memories. Sometimes spending more than they earn and ultimately leading to debt and a bad credit history.
  • The problem can be so severe that eventually it may lead to criminal behaviour, violence and incarceration.
  • Being abused or witnessing abuse can affect your future relationships

 

Domestic Violence can also be a problem for those who have a job. Many victims may be distracted at work, fear harassment at the workplace by the abusive partner, all of this can lead to a decline in productivity and an inability to find and keep a stable job. In fact any childhood trauma can have a future impact on finances.

 

How can trauma or domestic abuse lead to financial issues?

  • All of the negative emotions and abuse can lead to a lack of ambition
  • Many with severe stress disorders cannot plan or think far into the future
  • Sometimes abuse in the household can also include manipulation concerning money. The abuser can offer ‘treats’ as a way of gaining the victims silence.
  • This gives the victim a wrong viewpoint in the use of money and power, and can thus have an affect on their future financial dealings.

 

A large majority of domestic violence is against women and children. Many of these women and children could be successful contributors to the economy, but because of a lack in education, poverty, culture, and other problems, many of these women and children are exposed to violence, homelessness and severe health issues. All of these issues lead to survivors of abuse earning less or even nothing at all.

 

Unfortunately there are limited resources available and many of the organisations involved do not receive any government funding. To be able to implement a strategy for prevention of abuse, means that there must be more organised community programmes, and things like more social workers in the schools. The schools themselves can provide more education on the matter, and can provide a safe environment for those who need help. Communities need to support each other more, to stand together on such issues as Domestic Violence. To not keep silent about the problem.

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